CAMPING TIPS & TRICKS

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CAMPING TIPS & TRICKS

1. USE FRISBEES AS DISHES

Have you forgotten your camping plates, dear friend? Don't worry, quickly wash the frisbee, turn it over and load the portions. The frisbee keeps all sauces and returns to its original purpose at the end of the meal.

Really, why not bring a few frisbees instead of having a disposable meal? They may not be as efficient in terms of space but can be much more fun and serve two purposes. Each trip member can bring their frisbee to balance the load.

2. SLEEPING BAG PILLOW

Pillows are a subject of great particular preference. You may prefer yours soft or firm, feather or fluff.

We can ensure there’s one element you don’t like about cushions, though, and that is the amount of space they take up in packing. Businesses have come out with inflatable pillows that roll into impressively small spaces, but rolling around on air is rarely very comfortable. This usually leaves us filling a pillow inside our bag that takes up as much space as our clothing.

To craft the ultimate camping pillow, take the case for your sleeping bag and fill it whole with your most delicate clothing. Make sure that sleeves are unrolled and socks are not too tightly balled up so that there are no pressure points, and form the pillow to your desire. If you crave more support, then just add more clothing! You’ll love the fact that you’ve saved that much space in your backpack. We've tried to cover everything regarding the benefits of a sleeping bag case, but check the features on this mummy goose down sleeping bag, which will definitely have you heated on extreme temperatures.

3. FIX A BELT ON A TREE AND PUT SOME HOOKS ON IT TO DRY YOUR COOKWARE

The night is to sleep and recover for the next day. If you are an adventurer, you know that the nights are also used to dry things. Shoes, clothing, bags and, yes, pots. We have already discussed the use of silica gel packets to prevent the use of water from pots and pans. This small camping basket will allow these pots and pans to dry out overnight, so rust will be an even less likely scenario.

Take the belt and tie it to the tree. Therefore, attach a few hooks to your belt - some larger S-hooks look amazing. You can find them almost anywhere they sell pots or pans or in your local hardware store. Hang the pots on the tree to dry them overnight. Keep in mind that the pots should be hung so that the cooking surface faces the outside of the shell, as this discourages any bugs creating a temporary house in them.

4. USE A VEGETABLE PEELER TO STRIP THE SOAP FOR UNIQUE USES

The soap bar is a wonderful thing until you have to put it back in your bag. Usually, it ends up in your bag becoming a liquid soap that shouldn't be and provided you keep it in a plastic bag with lots of bubbles and soap moisture.

A convenient solution to the problem is to use a potato peeler to cut soap strips and use them whenever you need it. Keep them in one bag and simply take one before you take a shower or wash your hands.

5. BUY A DOUBLE SLEEPING BAG

If you share a tent with your partner or someone you don't mind being in the same sleeping bag with, a double sleeping bag is a huge investment. Body heat is what keeps us warm at night, and the purpose of sleeping bags is to reflect and maintain body heat. Therefore, a two-people bag is much better than two separate ones. Are you interested in a comfortable sleep session while being close to your partner? For that, we recommend the adjustable ultralight sleeping bag that features zips so that you can attach them together.

Sleeping bags are usually down or synthetic feathers and each has its advantages and disadvantages. The synthetic bags are cheaper and dry quickly, but takes up a lot of space. The goose down feathers are more expensive and retain moisture, but can be compressed into remarkably small packaging forms and are generally warmer. The double feathered sleeping bag not only keeps you warm, but it can also be stored in a small carrying bag for easy transportation.

6. BREAD TAGS USED AS CLOTHES-PINS

The bread tag is one of the most underappreciated goods around. They diligently keep bread bags closed but seldom notice any other direction before being thrown away. So, next time you consume a loaf of bread, we invite you to try them as clothes-pins on your future camping journey.

This is one of our greatest family camping tricks. Bread tags are not only affordable, but they also use up minimum space in your backpack.

So set a small bowl aside and begin getting those bread tags. They will quickly be doing their job in the sunshine, drying your garments and gripping them securely attached to the line.

7. HOW TO CRAFT AN ALTERNATIVE LANTERN

The only things you need are your headlamp and a tun jug of water or large water bottle. A transparent bottle will do, yet the greatest result arises from the kind of plastic that is not completely transparent, but rather that slightly hazy color that lets you notice water sloshing around inside.

If it gets dark, strap the headlamp to the side of the jug so that the beam is facing inside. The jug of water changes into a cool, bright sphere that emits light in every direction! This works because the water in the jug diffuses the light, which afterward is dispersed further by the cloudy plastic of the vessel.

This alternative lantern works excellent wherever you need ambient light. Whether you want to look for something inside your tent, clean up the picnic table, or start a campfire, your night just got a whole lot easier.

8. HOW TO KEEP YOUR CAMP COOKWARE RUST-FREE - SILICA GEL

Do you know those silica gel packets that seem to appear in every product? They are truly helpful for absorbing moisture, particularly for objects that tend to rust. That’s why we suggest getting a pack of them or collecting them from whatever packages you purchase, as they may simply save your cookware.

In an excellent world, we would dry our cookware thoroughly and deposit it in a moisture-free setting between uses. Still, climate variations, basements get sodden and we seldom dry our dishes in a hurry before packing them in our bags — and that is where silica gel packets come in.

Utilizing these packets keeps moisture from oxidizing away your cookware between uses. It’s frustrating to pull out your favorite bowl or skillet and find it spotted with rust, and this little trick will help prevent that collectively.

9. CORN CHIPS AND DORITOS MAKE GREAT COALS WHEN YOU CAN'T FIND SMALL STICKS

There are times when just a good ignition is not easily found and we have left those poor and inattentive objects in our camp arsenal as flammable candidates. But the good news is: A handful of Doritos will do a good job regarding lighting the fire.

You may be wondering how foods like Doritos can explode when they are put on fire. It is known that all starches, chemicals, oils, and flavors containing this snack as an ideal candidate for incineration and do wonders when the fire is lit.

While Doritos is recommended, most corn chips are adequate in some places. The corn oil in these chips is flammable and provides continuous burn, allowing you to light the fire.

10. MELT AND SEAL STRAW SECTIONS FOR STORING SPICES AND OTHER SMALL COMPOUNDS

It's a bit more animated than throwing some unfortunate Doritos into the bag, but it's a huge amount of space-saving and makes traveling around the room much easier in both packaging and packaging.

Our cooking skills are often limited due to a shortage of spices and spices in the forest. No one sells business travel bags, colt or rosemary, so we usually have to dissolve salt and pepper bottles.

The trick is to cut the plastic straws and cut them into short pieces and then cut one end with the candle and fill the straw with the spice you want. If you want more material, just cut a longer straw. So seal the other end and voila: You have a waterproof and ultra-portable selection of spices.

11. CRACK EGGS AHEAD OF TIME AND STORE THEM IN A WATER BOTTLE FOR AN EASY BREAKFAST

Bringing eggs for camp trips is a dangerous activity. If they break, you lose the eggs and have chaos to deal with.

Break the eggs forward and store them in a water bottle. You can do this in several ways. If you know that all eggs prefer sprinklers, you can whip the eggs and then keep them in a large bottle of water - you can also add milk, cheese, and spices.

If you have a slightly larger bottle of water, you can break the fried eggs with the yolk intact as well. Eat more for several meals or use a larger bottle for frequent shedding.

Be sure to keep them in the fridge so that they do not spoil and do not enjoy the ease of throwing fragile shells at you.

12. CRAFT A MAKESHIFT GROMMET BY TYING LINE AROUND A ROCK WRAPPED IN A TARP

Tarp grommets wear out fast and usually when you need them most. A huge quantity of tension is set on an almost tiny ring, which usually leads to the tarp fabric around it tearing loose.

If your tarp’s grommets have worn out, this camping trick is well worth learning. Find a small, roundish rock — about the size of a golf ball — and lay it in the place where you’d need a grommet.

On the underside of the tarp, make an “O” with your finger and thumb, and push on the rock so that it and the tarp pass through the O. Pinch off the tarp with your finger and thumb, and tie a line tightly around the pinched tarp.

As an extra, this makeshift grommet will endure considerably more reliable than a regular one, since the strain from the line is being distributed over a larger section of the tarp.

13. FILL A BOTTLE WITH HOT WATER AND PLACE IT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SLEEPING BAG

With this trick, we are using the capacity to store water heat - this time, we bring the heat to an end: our feet.

The legs appear to be the last part of the body to warm up when we fall asleep in the bag. To counteract this, take a bottle and fill it with hot water just before departure. Throw it at the foot of the sleeping bag and enjoy its lasting heat.

Make sure you use good quality water bottles because waking up in a wet bag is not fun. Also, if hard plastic keeps your water bottle from falling asleep, try burying the mug with two shirts to diminish its presence in the sleeping bag.

14. USE GALLON JUGS OF WATER AS ICE PACKS IN YOUR COOLER

Bringing ice on a camping trip can be challenging. It melts fast and transforms into a wet mess, indicating that any non-plastic food packaging will soon become moist and soggy.

As an alternative to pouring ice into your cooler, freeze gallon jugs of water and put them in instead. They won’t crack when frozen, and these jugs have built-in room for enlargement in freezing. Later, as the ice warms and turns into water, you’ll have drinking water ready without having to bring extra.

There are two points to retain when packing water for a camping trip: water is unquestionably necessary, and it is also very heavy. Therefore, pack more than enough drinking water, but try not to pack water that will go to waste — like ice that will soon melt and become undrinkable. This hack helps with both points simultaneously by allowing your ice to become extra drinking water after it has done its job keeping your food cold.

15. BURN SAGE IN YOUR CAMPFIRE TO KEEP MOSQUITOES AWAY

Mosquitoes can dampen an otherwise great camping experience. Knowing how to repel them, even without slathering yourself in unhealthy levels of pest repellent, is a great skill to have when camping.

Take along a few bundles of sage the next time you go camping. Afterward, when the sun is setting and the campfire is going, burn a bit of sage with your fire. Or for a longer-lasting effect, set the sage on fire and let it smolder and smoke by the edge of the campfire. Mosquitoes are naturally kept away by sage smoke, and you’ll find a lot less of them buzzing around you.

Remember that mosquitoes, while their presence may be felt at all times of day, are usually most active at dawn and dusk. It’s best to be prepared by having some burning sage ready at those times.

16. KEEP A SEPARATE PAIR OF SOCKS TO SLEEP TIGHT

It is difficult to explain the psychological comfort of a pair of clean socks. Putting one on can boost morale. If you prefer to sleep in socks, try keeping a pair just for sleep. Walking socks do not have to be thick - even thin socks.

Even if you can't shower, a pair of clean, dry socks helps the body differentiate between daytime activities and nighttime comfort. Not only will it be easier to wear, but it will also use dust, dirt, skin, shells, pine needles and anything else that is attached to socks to keep inside the sleeping bag.

17. HOW TO KEEP YOUR ITEMS DRY - GARBAGE BAG

Weather is everything while you’re camping, and an experienced camper understands that you can never be too prepared for Mother Nature’s capricious spirits. Once you’re warm and dry inside of your tent, there’s nothing else to worry about — except, of course, you can’t get warm or dry because your backpack and all of its contents got drenched in the mist.

This know-how gives the ultimate cost-to-benefit ratio: a single garbage bag in exchange for warmness and dryness. Solely overlay the inside of your rucksack with a garbage bag before storing all of your items into it. For the cost of a trash bag, you get dry clothes and a dry sleeping bag for your trip, guaranteed.

Evading soaked clothes is not just essential for your well-being, but also your safety. Wet clothing can cause you to get frozen very quickly, which can lead to sickness, so take this hack to avoid the matter!

18. DRY YOUR SHOES OVERNIGHT BY REMOVING THE INSOLES AND INSERTING DIRTY CLOTHES INTO THEM

Wet shoes are a serious inconvenience when camping. If you are extremely wet everywhere, drying them can also be a daunting task.

Try to remove the shoes and put them aside, then wipe some of the dry and used clothing on the shoes. Keep in mind that moisture naturally spreads from damp to dry places, meaning that moisture is transferred to your shoes.

In the morning, dry the moist clothing by hanging it by the fire or strapping it on the back of your backpack to air dry.

19. GLUE SANDPAPER INSIDE THE TOP OF YOUR MATCH HOLDER FOR EASY LIGHTING AND WATERPROOFING

Matches are an essential part of camping, but often it seems to fail. They can get wet, the case is wet, or fall until the strike is smooth. These camping hacks ensure that your games are ready to hit you when you need them.

Buy ore sandpaper, with glue on one side, then you can glue it on. If not, some glue will do the trick. Wrap sandpaper in the lid of a small waterproof container to keep fit.

Abrasive paper not only provides a large and coarse impact surface but will also be protected by a waterproof container.

20. PREPARE YOUR MEALS AT HOME

By preparing a meal before embarking on the trip, you can reduce your cooking time and its messed result. If you know what ingredients you need for a meal, try cutting them out in advance.

21. BRING MICROFIBER TOWELS

If you carry equipment, weight can also be a problem when going camping. Microfiber towels are lighter and more absorbent than regular towels. Aren't you worried about weight? They also dry quickly, which means you don't have to worry about growing mold after packaging. Using them instead of paper towels reduces waste, which makes you environmentally friendly!

22. PLAN AHEAD. MAKE A CHECKLIST

Checklists are completely important when it comes to all the packing, unloading that goes on the camping trip! Preparing a checklist first and deciding what to go in the backpack will help you never forget important items such as matches, food items, or other things that can make or break a comfortable place to sleep.

 


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